top of page

An initiative started in India to enhance public education by empowering education leaders to drive school improvements and bring quality education to all children.

OUR WORK IN LAST DECADE

272,000

276,000

36 million 

schools

education leaders

children reached

Andhra Pradesh

Backward Classes Welfare Department established a new Society in the name of Mahatma Jyotiba Phule Andhra Pradesh Backward Classes Welfare Residential Educational Institutions Society (MJPAPBCWREIS).

The society serves:

105

35,000+

schools

students

105

schools

students

35,000+

Backward Classes Welfare Department established a new Society in the name of Mahatma Jyotiba Phule Andhra Pradesh Backward Classes Welfare Residential Educational Institutions Society (MJPAPBCWREIS).

The society serves:

Bihar

Education Departments We Work With

Mantra4Change.png

Project Based Learning

To build capacity and momentum for PBL as a mechanism to improve the quality of teaching and learning at scale in India in a sustainable way

To bridge the literacy and numeracy learning gap in learners from backward classes in MJPAPBCWREIS schools.

To promote sustainable practices for PBL and learning by doing.

  •  

    Project-based learning (PBL) is generally used to describe a teaching method in which students learn by actively engaging in real-world and personally meaningful projects.

    The Educational Research Review recently published an analysis of existing research comparing the effects of project-based learning with traditional instruction. The analysis captured results from 30 peer-reviewed journal articles, representing 12,585 students from 189 schools in nine countries. The results showed that project-based learning has a “medium to large positive effect” on students’ academic achievement compared with traditional instruction.

  •  

    The National Education Policy (NEP 2020) proposes using project-based learning in various ways. It offers holistic and multi-dimensional means to assess and communicate student progress by incorporating project-based learning into the curriculum. It also insists that early childhood care and education consists of “multi-faceted, play and activity-based learning”. Under their larger goal that “learning should be holistic, integrated, enjoyable and engaging”, the NEP insists on using activity-based learning from Anganwadi/pre-school levels to Grade 5. Further, with the growth of online and hybrid learning media over the past couple of years, the NEP suggests blending experiential and activity-based learning with online education to cater to the social, affective, and psychomotor dimensions of learning. The NEP recognises the need for project-based approaches to learning for holistic student assessments, of students with special needs, early childhood care and education, and online learning and to promote a more holistic approach to student learning and outcomes.

  •  

    Andhra Pradesh: 105 schools. 240 teachers and 11,513 students.

    Bihar: 29,052 schools and 29,052 teachers

Mantra4Change (1).png

PHOTO GALLERY

PBL in Action

“An English teacher from a school in the Eluru district of Andhra Pradesh started PBL in her grade 6 and grade 7 classrooms with great vigour and hope to engage her students better and improve their FLN skills. Her school being a single-teacher school, she had to take care of English for all grades from 5th to 10th. Maintaining her high energy levels and sustained passion for conducting PBL classes was becoming increasingly arduous for her. At the end of the second project and the dipping motivation levels, she experienced a wonder (in her own words). A low-achieving student who struggled with essential English reading and speaking came forward to perform in an activity and spoke fluent English. What surprised the teacher was that after the activity, she approached the teacher and said she wanted to learn English and study well. The teacher was overwhelmed by this turn of events and felt instantly energised and excited for the positive changes PBL would bring in the future.”

Sriram, Program Lead, Mantra4Change

A day before the Bi-Weekly Learning Circle is conducted, the upcoming Project is sent to the teachers on their respective PBL WhatsApp groups. On the day of the Learning Circle, the teachers are taken through the upcoming PBL Project so as to provide a gist of the project and clarify any doubts or misconceptions regarding concepts and activities. During the 5th Learning Circle, Ms Padma from Lepakshi school took ownership to introduce the project, explaining all four days to all the teachers in the LC, detailing how it is relevant to the syllabus, how it is beneficial to students and did not miss out on a single point for each day. The teachers showered her with abundant appreciation for her initiative and expressed how inspired they felt by her zeal. She was also appreciated by the society's leadership committee. She also proceeded to volunteer to facilitate an entire Learning Circle soon, after receiving confidence from her peers and mentors.​

A few team members from the Mantra team visited Bethamcherla School in Nandyal district of Andhra Pradesh in the third week of November. The objective of the visit was to observe the on-ground implementation of PBL lessons and provide any support they may need in better implementation of the PBL program. The school has been operational for less than a year.

During the visit, the team interacted with a bunch of Grade 6 and 7 students who had just completed the project ‘Our Dream Hostel’. The models of dream hostels that the students had created reflected deep thinking and application of need-based design principles. On asking why they included an elevator in a 3-storied building or a bathtub, students gave insightful responses, deeply rooted in their context and experiences. They said that it takes them a lot of time to go up and down using stairs from their dormitories to their classrooms. They would want to save that time by using elevators. They said they included bathtubs because they wanted to experience the luxury of a good bathroom in their dream building. They felt that creating such futuristic designs allows them to imagine and hope for a better future, for things that are beyond their immediate reach.

On the 14th of December, Tekkali school in Srikakulam district of Andhra Pradesh was visited with an objective to understand how PBL is being implemented by the teachers and Principals in a school that has been operating for more than 20 years and that has an adequate number of teachers. Ms. Durgabai is the English teacher of the school who teaches 2 batches of 40 students each for grade 6 and the same for grade 7. She takes PBL for about 120 students in her school. Upon entering her classroom to observe a grade 7 PBL class, we noticed that all the students had worn their ID cards that they had made in the month of September. The teacher went on to conduct the PBL class based on the newest PBL project. As the class came to an end, on being asked about the ID cards, the students said that it is the ID card they had made as part of their 4th project, and had been wearing them ever since. Their teacher Ms. Durgabai took the effort to individually laminate all the ID cards, so that the card can sustain the year without tearing-away. Ms. Durgabai opined that the ID cards give the students a sense of identity and individuality, and pride over one’s being. It has now become a part of students’ school uniforms and they enjoy wearing it.

Field Visits